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    Inhaltsangabe

    The traditional attitude toward creativity in the American business world is to "think outside the box": to brainstorm without restraint in hopes of coming up with a breakthrough idea, often in moments of crisis. Sometimes it works, but it’s a problem-specific solution that does nothing to engender creative thinking more generally.

    Inside the Box demonstrates Systematic Inventive Thinking (SIT), a method that systemizes creativity as part of the corporate culture. SIT requires thinking "inside the box", working in one’s familiar world to create new ideas independent of specific problems.

    Dozens of books discuss how to make creative thinking part of a corporate culture, but none takes the innovative and unconventional approach of Inside the Box. SIT’s techniques and principles have instilled creative thinking into such companies as Procter & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, and other industry leaders. Inside the Box shows how corporations have successfully used SIT in business settings as diverse as medicine, technology, new product development, and food packaging. With "inside the box" thinking, companies of any size can become sufficiently creative to solve problems even before they develop and to innovate on an ongoing basis.

    ©2013 Drew Boyd and Jacob Goldenberg (P)2013 HighBridge Company

    Kritikerstimmen

    "Among the few ideas that have fundamentally changed how I look at life is the idea that creativity can be simple and systematic. In this book, Jacob and Drew explain the basic building blocks for creativity and, by doing so, help all of better express our potential." (Dan Ariely, author of Predictably Irrational)

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    • JR
    • 24.02.2021

    It teaches you a lot about invention

    The five templates for Innovation (subtraction, division, multiplication, task unification, and attribute dependence) are easy to understand and make sense from my point view. The accompanying principles of function-follows-form, the closed world exploitation, and the conscious use of contradictions are also easy to grasp and are properly explained. I think I will be more creative from now on 🙂. I also liked that they enphazise that creativity and innovation is open to everyone, if he or she is willing to practice, and is not the exclusive property of some geniuses with an IQ high up in the sky, as some people, unfortunately including parents and teachers, sometimes believe..

    My only objection: do they really have to deride other creativity approaches, say, as "fluffy"? Actually, "fluffy" Brainstorming is at the core of their method, and present in each template. For example, in the substraction template: after you substract one component, you have to "ask yourself what benefits a product or service without that component may have; who might find it valuable?". If this is not Brainstorming and divergent thinking, then what is it? I think the templates are better understood as powerful "springboards" to do brainstorming. The very powerful and useful method of analogy (think of bio-mimicry in engineering design, or genetic optimization algorithms in operations research) is not even mentioned. My critique is then, that the listener might be left with a narrow view of creativity, to the exclusion of other powerful and complementary approaches.

    But the book is, apart from that critique, excellent and worth listening.