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    Inhaltsangabe

    From the author of Against Empathy comes a different kind of happiness book, one that shows us how suffering is an essential source of both pleasure and meaning in our lives.

    Why do we so often seek out physical pain and emotional turmoil? We go to movies that make us cry, or scream, or gag. We poke at sores, eat spicy foods, immerse ourselves in hot baths, run marathons. Some of us even seek out pain and humiliation in sexual role-play. Where do these seemingly perverse appetites come from?

    Drawing on groundbreaking findings from psychology and brain science, The Sweet Spot shows how the right kind of suffering sets the stage for enhanced pleasure. Pain can distract us from our anxieties and help us transcend the self. Choosing to suffer can serve social goals; it can display how tough we are or, conversely, can function as a cry for help. Feelings of fear and sadness are part of the pleasure of immersing ourselves in play and fantasy and can provide certain moral satisfactions. And effort, struggle, and difficulty can, in the right contexts, lead to the joys of mastery and flow.

    But suffering plays a deeper role as well. We are not natural hedonists - a good life involves more than pleasure. People seek lives of meaning and significance; we aspire to rich relationships and satisfying pursuits, and this requires some amount of struggle, anxiety, and loss. Brilliantly argued, witty, and humane, Paul Bloom shows how a life without chosen suffering would be empty - and worse than that, boring.  

    Supplemental enhancement PDF accompanies the audiobook.

    PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

    ©2021 Paul Bloom (P)2021 HarperCollins Publishers

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    Great book - erudite, cool and enlightening

    Paul Bloom’s books aren’t very long. That’s both positive and negative. Positive because what you have got to say and offer of ideas, can often be said in few words. Negative because the prose and erudition of Bloom is really good auditive company. In this book, though, he reveals why his books aren’t any longer, I suspect. He can only write early mornings for an hour or so, that is when he’s in the sweet spot. Steven Pinker told, I believe, that he could and would seclude himself for months to write his books, apparently he can be in the sweet spot for writing for days, weeks in a row.
    If you are interested in knowing about the questions of happiness, meaning and pain, this is a great book.
    It was interesting to me how he used Viktor Frankl’s ideas about meaning. It’s been decades since I read Viktor Frankel and other existentialists, but somehow I suppose it became those many years ago part of my outlook on life. In Bloom it’s like having a famous kindred spirit, yet sharper and nicer.
    Bloom taught me a lot about empathy in his book Against Empathy, from this book I also learned a lot or remembered stuff, I kind a knew and wants to know.