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Machines Like Me

Autor: Ian McEwan
Sprecher: Billy Howle
Spieldauer: 10 Std. und 54 Min.
4.5 out of 5 stars (154 Bewertungen)

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Inhaltsangabe

Random House presents the audiobook edition of Machines Like Me, by Ian McEwan. 

Britain has lost the Falklands war, Margaret Thatcher battles Tony Benn for power and Alan Turing achieves a breakthrough in artificial intelligence. In a world not quite like this one, two lovers will be tested beyond their understanding.

Machines Like Me occurs in an alternative 1980s London. Charlie, drifting through life and dodging full-time employment, is in love with Miranda, a bright student who lives with a terrible secret. When Charlie comes into money, he buys Adam, one of the first batch of synthetic humans. With Miranda’s assistance, he co-designs Adam’s personality. This near-perfect human is beautiful, strong and clever - a love triangle soon forms.  

These three beings will confront a profound moral dilemma. Ian McEwan’s subversive and entertaining new novel poses fundamental questions: what makes us human? Our outward deeds or our inner lives? Could a machine understand the human heart? This provocative and thrilling tale warns of the power to invent things beyond our control.

©2019 Ian McEwan (P)2019 Random House Audiobooks

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Gesamt
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Sterne
    78
  • 4 Sterne
    53
  • 3 Sterne
    12
  • 2 Sterne
    8
  • 1 Stern
    3
Sprecher
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Sterne
    100
  • 4 Sterne
    31
  • 3 Sterne
    9
  • 2 Sterne
    2
  • 1 Stern
    1
Geschichte
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Sterne
    71
  • 4 Sterne
    47
  • 3 Sterne
    12
  • 2 Sterne
    8
  • 1 Stern
    5

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  • Gesamt
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    2 out of 5 stars

langatmig

An sich ein spannendes Thema, ich fand das Buch aber sehr langatmig mit unnatürlich wirkenden moralisierenden "Dialogen" und fehlenden Spannungsspitzen. Das Thema rund um die Vergewaltigung wirkte auf mich sehr konstruiert, so als wollte der Autor noch einen Nebenplot schaffen weil die Geschichte um Adam das Buch nicht gefüllt hätte. Den Sprecher fand ich ebenfalls nicht besonders abwechslungsreich. Würde das Buch nicht weiter empfehlen.

  • Gesamt
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    1 out of 5 stars

Leider nicht überzeugend

Geschichte und Plot sind ebenso vorhersehbar, wie abwegig. Die 2-3 interessanten Wendungen können die Schwächen insbesondere der technischen Grundlage und Annahme, auf denen die Fiktion fußt, nicht wett machen. Sehr schade, andere Werke von Ian McEwan wie z.B. Saturday hatten mir sehr gut gefallen, "Machines Like Me" leider überhaupt nicht.

  • Gesamt
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    2 out of 5 stars

Boring and self-important

This was very obviously written by an older white dude. It's all about sex, sex with a 22 year old woman who obviously falls in love with this boring and frankly uncaring man who's ten years her senior and his delusions about his superiority over even a definitely superior robot. The man keeps telling us how he's in love with the 22 year old but tbh he never shows it. He doesn't actually listen to her or cares about her, all he thinks about is having sex with her and saying yes to her so he can have more sex with her. Very bland, very boring.
The robot is only in this so the author can force his unhealthy and boring views on what he calls love but is actually just sexual attraction on us. Somehow the robot falls in love with the 22 year old, which is repeatedly blamed on her having programmed it into him, even though that's never confirmed and we were informed at the beginning of the book that the choosing the two got to do didn't even matter that much. But of course it's her fault, men being attracted to women and unable to not force her to listen to their poetry, confessions of "love" and feeling sexually attracted to her for just existing is always blamed on women.
Like I said, the entire worldview portrayed in this was very boring and bland and convenient. We're informed that racism is kinda in the past, technological advancements have been through the roof in recent years and homophobia is a thing of the past- none of this is ever really shown. Aside from Turing there are no LGBTQ+ characters in this. Turing himself told us about how he was persecuted for being gay- which then somehow stopped. It's never explained. The alternative timeline sounded interesting but was never turned into real worldbuilding since it was always overshadowed by our main characters personal problems, which were so bland and unrelatable that it was impossible to care.
The robot is also not only unrelatable but uninteresting and unlikeable. All he does is sit around and think, but none of his thoughts are ever unique or groundbreaking or even interesting. He basically harasses the woman he's in love with and has no nuance to how he acts. I kept waiting for him to do anything interesting, rebel, have an actual meaningful discussion with another character, basically do anything, but he doesn't. We're somehow supposed to feel sympathetic towards all these robots and their suffering but they are so flat and unreal that it's just not possible to really care.
And finally the treatment of the whole sexual assault storyline was very unsympathetic and weird. Why was this even in the book? Why was the focus so much on making this woman into the bad guy for getting revenge and the actual rape and rapist were treated which much more indifference? I know why, but why did people decide it was okay or necessary to be in this story?
That's actually kind of the baseline of this review: Why was this book written? What was I supposed to take from this? Why does the author live in this horribly boring world?

  • Gesamt
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    5 out of 5 stars

Amazing story

Second book by the author after Nutshell that completely grapped me. He goes for plots with a twist and basic ethical and moral issues of our times without being less entertaining.

  • Gesamt
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    4 out of 5 stars

Gehört zu den besseren Geschichten.

Machines like me gehört sicherlich zu den besseren Geschichten die man hier finden kann. Sie ist recht einfallsreich und besonders gut gelungen ist die Konstruktion einer Realität die auf der Tatsache basiert dass zum einen bestimmte Ereignisse, an die wir uns erinnern können (Falkland Krieg, Attentat auf Magret Thatcher...) anders ausgegangen sind, als sie es tatsächlich waren und zweitens darauf, dass die technischen Errungenschaften, derer wir uns heutzutage rühmen, circa 40 Jahre früher zur Verfügung standen als in der Realität. Für die vollen fünf Sterne fehlt mir noch ein gewisser Kniff, von dem ich selber gar nicht sagen könnte wie er aussehen sollte. Wenn man Geschichten mag, die die ethischen Implikationen technischer Errungenschaften unterhaltsam aufblättern, dann ist dies mit Sicherheit kein Fehlkauf.

  • Gesamt
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    5 out of 5 stars

Good food for thought

McEwan is certainly brilliant in wrapping his deep philosophical speculation, some of the most important for the modern human, into an intriguing story! Totally recommendable!

  • Gesamt
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    1 out of 5 stars

Disappointing

Started well and interesting. Ended boring with a collection of futuristic commonplaces. What a pity.