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The legend begins...

Greece in the age of heroes. Patroclus, an awkward young prince, has been exiled to the kingdom of Phthia to be raised in the shadow of King Peleus and his golden son, Achilles. “The best of all the Greeks”—strong, beautiful, and the child of a goddess—Achilles is everything the shamed Patroclus is not. Yet despite their differences, the boys become steadfast companions. Their bond deepens as they grow into young men and become skilled in the arts of war and medicine—much to the displeasure and the fury of Achilles’ mother, Thetis, a cruel sea goddess with a hatred of mortals.

When word comes that Helen of Sparta has been kidnapped, the men of Greece, bound by blood and oath, must lay siege to Troy in her name. Seduced by the promise of a glorious destiny, Achilles joins their cause, and torn between love and fear for his friend, Patroclus follows. Little do they know that the Fates will test them both as never before and demand a terrible sacrifice.

Built on the groundwork of the Iliad, Madeline Miller’s page-turning, profoundly moving, and blisteringly paced retelling of the epic Trojan War marks the launch of a dazzling career.

©2012 Madeline Miller (P)2012 HarperCollinsPublishers

Kritikerstimmen

“[Miller] makes a persuasive argument for the timeliness of her subject. …Miller’s winning debut focuses on Patroclus, a young prince living in Achilles’ golden shadow. Miller also gives voice to many of the women who were also consigned to the shadows.” ( Publishers Weekly, Spring 2012 Preview, Top 10 Literary Fiction)
“You don’t need to be familiar with Homer’s The Iliad (or Brad Pitt’s Troy, for that matter) to find Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles spellbinding....her explorations of ego, grief, and love’s many permutations are both familiar and new....[A] timeless love story.” ( O magazine)
“A psychologically astute Iliad prelude featuring the heady, star-crossed adolescence of future heroes Patroclus and Achilles.” ( Vogue)

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  • Gesamt
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Worthy of a greek hero!

Let me start by saying, that I love greek myths and stories about heroes, but for some reason I always strongly disliked the story of the Troyan War. So going into this audiobook I was quite sceptical if I'd be able to finish the 11 hours of troyan warfare.In the end, the fact that it as a gay love story made ne to curious not to listen t it and let me tell you, it was a wild ride and I regret not one second of it. The story is so incredibly well written that you are basically unable to stop listening. And if it's not the story, then it's the voices. Each and everyone is super well thought out and especially Patrocles and Achilles voice just make me want 11 more hours of story to be read.

Summary:
If you are an absolute nerd concerning greek myths and the like, this would be my top recommendation! And if you're on the hunt for a adventurous gay love story, give it a shot!

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  • Gesamt
    5 out of 5 stars
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Absolutely stunning and with the pathos so tangible it verges on being a real epic.

It makes you realise what price must be paid to be sung by all prosperity; It sheds light on how inseparable fame and vanity are; and it shows how inexorably impossible it is to be both heroic and happy.
Patroclus was only a mortal, and his fate, just like that of all other mortals, was determined by the gods. Yet maybe it was the gods’ intention, or simply by chance, the utmost significance of his humble existence does not lie in his role of inducing Achilles to kill and gain the glory of the best warrior. His existence made all the difference, because it ensures that Achilles will not be remembered only as a famous cold-blooded butcher on the battlefield in his grief, but his beauty, the way he smiles and plays the lyre, his gentleness and kindness shown in his love towards his “most beloved” — that he was no god, but rather a man of flesh and blood; a man who was born not merely to fulfill a vacant prophecy, but just as well for human emotion and sentiment, and humanity itself.
He was not a god, and thank heaven he was not. Patroclus made him stick to being human, which he definitely should pride himself on, for this, and only this, would have the power to make hearts tremble, and tears spill.