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    Inhaltsangabe

    Great music is a language unto its own, a means of communication of unmatched beauty and genius. And it has an undeniable power to move us in ways that enrich our lives - provided it is understood.

    If you have ever longed to appreciate great concert music, to learn its glorious language and share in its sublime pleasures, the way is now open to you, through this series of 48 wonderful lectures designed to make music accessible to everyone who yearns to know it, regardless of prior training or knowledge. It's a lecture series that will enable you to first grasp music's forms, techniques, and terms - the grammatical elements that make you fluent in its language - and then use that newfound fluency to finally hear and understand what the greatest composers in history are actually saying to us.

    And as you learn the gifts given us by nearly every major composer, you'll come to know there is one we share with each of them - a common humanity that lets us finally understand that these were simply people speaking to us, sharing their passion and wanting desperately to be heard. Using digitally recorded musical passages to illustrate his points, Professor Greenberg will take you inside magnificent compositions by Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and more. Even if you have listened to many of these illustrative pieces throughout your life - as so many of us have - you will never hear them the same way again after experiencing these lectures.

    PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

    ©2006 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2006 The Great Courses

    Das sagen andere Hörer zu How to Listen to and Understand Great Music, 3rd Edition

    Nur Nutzer, die den Titel gehört haben, können Rezensionen abgeben.
    Gesamt
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    Sprecher
    • 5 out of 5 stars
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    Geschichte
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    Rezensionen - mit Klick auf einen der beiden Reiter können Sie die Quelle der Rezensionen bestimmen.

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    • Gesamt
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    Ohren öffnend!

    Musik ist auf erneuerte Weise in mein Leben heimgekehrt. Habe den Kurs in drei Wochen gehört, und viel Musik dazu. Wirklich empfehlenswert, auch das Englisch leicht verständlich. Mangel: die entsprechenden musikalischen Fachbegriffe auf Deutsch für Laien oft schwer zu eruieren. Waheo König.

    6 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      4 out of 5 stars
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      3 out of 5 stars
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    A History of Music and Composition

    Very interesting and amusing lectures on classical wester music and composition,
    that inspire and get you hooked on the concepts and complexity of classical music.

    Only the speakers conclusions on the interaction between language and music are a
    bit twisted due to the author/speakers strong accent, that is rather an interpretation of
    the languages.

    3 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      4 out of 5 stars
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    Befriend Someone Who Knows European Languages!

    בס״ד

    Prof. Greenberg delivers this course with great enthusiasm and profound knowledge which he shares in a brilliant fashion, especially under the conditions of such a short series of lectures which cannot be highly enough recommended in toto.
    Two of his theses, though, deserve to be contradicted emphatically.
    Prof Greenberg states that “great works of art are timeless”. Errh, no! Works of art are neither timeless, nor timebound: They are historic. That means that they have different impacts on a given timeline, first when they are written, com¬posed, painted or sculpted, second when they are published, and from that time on they crystallise anew in any possible recipient, according to their historical conditions of reception. We may try as we want, we cannot hear Beethoven’s piano sonata op. 111 the same way as her first listeners, our ears are used to a rather different range of music and environmental sound, and when we first encounter her – say, at the age of 13 – we will hear with different ears than when we hear it at 59, with a greater background of experience. What makes works of art great is their ability to re-emerge in their crystal form anew to each generation of recipients brand new, and to do so again and again and again.
    The second disputable thesis is that “music is the most abstract of arts”. Again: No! Forms, colours, and sounds you can find in nature, words you cannot. If you want to experience the crystallisation that I just described in literature, especially poetry, you must free the chiffre, the black letter, combine it with other letters and make it sound in your mind: That is concretion of the most abstract. Thus, of course, poetry is the most abstract of arts.
    These are quite marginal problems, but now I come to the problem that really tarnishes the splendour of this course: Although he professes otherwise, Prof Greenberg suffers of the deeply rooted disdain of his countrymen for “the foreign lingo”. “Agnus” is neither “angus” nor “anjus”, it is pronounced like “aghnus”. In German there are indeed a handful of words in which “ch” is phonetically realised as “k”, like in “Lachs”, “Flachs”, “Achse” (you see a pattern?), but they really are rare exceptions. The usual pronunciation of “ch” is either quite guttural, like in “Achtung”, “Bach”, “Nacht”, or softly like in “Richard”, “dich”, and “Verzicht”. It is not “welk ein schoner Abend” (“welk” means “withered”), but “welch ein schöner Abend”. Here we are already at the second fault: The horizontal double dot on German vowels symbolises an “e” in current script, as used for centuries in Germany until the stupid Nazis forbade it. It comes to indicate that the vowel is altered in sound (umgelautet). “A” becomes “ä” (ae), “o” becomes “ö” (oe) and “u” becomes “ü” (ue).
    This leads to mistakes in the material that Prof Greenberg chooses to illustrate his lectures. “Mit Menschen- und mit Engelszungen, / Mit Harfen und mit Zimbeln schön“. The singers pronounce within these verses as: „Enjelsdsungen“, “Dsim¬beln” and „schon“. „Schon” means “already”, but the text states “schön” – “beau¬tifully”! The sound is quite like the first “e” in “Berkeley”. And the “z” is almost all the time realised as “ts”, like in “Tsar”, thus: “Tsimbeln”. By the way: Johann Pachelbel’s surname does not sound like “Taco Bell”, rather the emphasis is on the second syllable, and the “ch” is pronounced like the one in “Achtung”.

    Unfortunately, Prof Greenberg does not content himself with manhandling the German language, he goes on to do this to French, too. I fail to understand that someone who has got no problems at pronouncing “Debussy” correctly seems incapable to do the same with “Lully” or “déjà vu”. Can you not see that it is the same sound? “Déjà vu” (seen before), not “déjà vous” – “You already”; “Lully”, not “Loully”, “Dufay”, not “Doufaë”. And in failing to understand the subtleties of European languages Prof Greenberg continues this phonological nonsense in his own: “Renaissance”! How many “s”? Right, there are two, like in “masses”, “brass”, “grass”. Hence, the sound of the “s” is sharp! “Renaissance”, not “renaissance”. Similar in “baroque”. Prof Greenberg rightly states that it stems from the Portuguese word “barocco”, “elliptical round”: Two “c”, two! Thus, the second vowel is short, not long. In the run of the course these things come to vex you, indeed!

    This said: Onward, Professor, onward! But befriend someone who speaks foreign languages correctly! I cannot imagine that on the vast areal of the University of California, Berkeley, not one single soul can be found who does.

    1 Person fand das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Geschichte
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    wahnsinnig aufschlussreich

    war eine totale überraschung für mich. ein ganz tolles buch. gut geschrieben. gut gelesen. tolle informationen

    1 Person fand das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
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    A really great course!

    Among the several series from the Great Courses, this was not only the most challenging, but the most interesting one.
    Prof. Greenberg is tremendous fun to listen to, with just the right mixture of humor, extremely bad humor, passion for the subject matter and knowledge. If you are at all interested in understanding "classic" music, this is the course for you!

    1 Person fand das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
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    Thank you, Professor Greenberg !

    Now all those small pieces from "music litetature" which i remember from my music school, are nicely set in place.

    1 Person fand das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
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    Comprehensive and insightful

    The course covers Western music from its early beginnings in classical Greece until the beginning of the 20th century - more or less in chronological order and always in the context of its time in terms of historical events, mindset, philosophy and other aspects - which is essential for understanding the specific music and it’s assumed impact on (then) contemporary listeners. Robert Greenberg drives the story through its long and windy terrain with passion, structure, consistence and deeper insights progressively gained at later stages of the course. The material is filled with numerous facts and stories and occasional comparisons with our current life for more clarity of argument. Nevertheless, despite the 48 or so lessons, not every major composer can be covered (e.g., Vivaldi is left out) due to the wealth of musical history as a whole. I’ll definitely search for more - more specialized - course of Prof. Greenberg.

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
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    Wer ist Koerschel?

    Ein unterhaltsamee und aufschlussreicher Einblick in Muisikgeschichte. Das einzige was etwas stört ist die Art wie fremde Sprachen verballhornt werden. Es wäre schön wenn an der Aussprache etwas korrigiert werden könnte. Ohne auf Details engehen zu wollen - ein früherer Rezensent hat das schon ausführlich getan - stört es etwas immer Koerschel zu hören statt Köchel.

    • Gesamt
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    Grossartig!

    Ich habe lange selbst Musik gemacht, es in der Schule bis zum Abi durchgezogen und leider im Laufe des Erwerbslebens aus den Augen verloren. Langsam erwacht das Interesse aber wieder und dieses Hörbuch ist dazu eine grossartige Gelegenheit.

    In 32 Lektionen führt uns Dr. Bob durch die Musikgeschichte. Ja, es ist eine Geschichte der Auslassungen, vieles wird nur angerissen, aber nie der große Überblick aus den Augen verloren. In knackigen Abschnitten zu 45 Minuten (wie eine ordentliche Univorlesung) mit vielen Hörbeispielen werden die Techniken der einzelnen Epochen vorgestellt und analysiert.

    Danach ist man zwar kein Musikhistoriker, kann aber die gehörte Musik deutlich besser einordnen. Auch in den geschichtlichen Hintergrund.

    Ja, es ist ein englischer Kurs. Der aber sehr gut zu verstehen ist (wenn man ein paar musikalische Fachbegriffe gut raten oder nachschlagen kann). Und das begleitende PDF fasst nochmal alles zusammen, so daß man auch Stellen, an denen man nicht ganz mitkommt, nochmal nachlesen kann.

    Fazit: Ich werde die weiteren Kurse von Dr Bob alle hören und ich weiß jetzt schon, daß ich sie lieben werde.

    Danke Audible, daß es das momentan umsonst dazu gibt, ich hoffe auf weitere Great Courses!!!

    • Gesamt
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    Unglaublich unterhaltsam und lehrreich

    Das Buch bringt genau das, was der Titel verspricht und man bekommt einen zweiten analytischen Zugang zur klassischen Musik. Dieser ergibt sich ganz natürlich aus der prägnant dargestellten Geschichte und Entwicklung der Klassik. Unbeschränkt bleibt dabei der erste und unmittelbare ästhetische Zugang, den der Autor durch seine ansteckende Begeisterung und Direktheit natürlich ebenso unterstützt; der Autor ist eine echte Begabung am Pult. Erhellend die vielen im Detail erklärten Stücke und die farbigen biographischen Skizzen. Schön und praktisch auch die Gliederung in aufeinander bezogene Abschnitte in Vorlesungslänge.