Jetzt kostenlos testen

Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism

Sprecher: Jim Gimian
Spieldauer: 8 Std. und 50 Min.
5 out of 5 stars (10 Bewertungen)

Danach 9,95 € pro Monat. Jederzeit kündbar.

ODER
Im Warenkorb

Inhaltsangabe

In this modern spiritual classic, the Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa highlights the commonest pitfall to which every aspirant on the spiritual path falls prey: what he calls spiritual materialism. The universal tendency, he shows, is to see spirituality as a process of self-improvement - the impulse to develop and refine the ego when the ego is, by nature, essentially empty. "The problem is that ego can convert anything to its own use," he said, "even spirituality."

His incisive, compassionate teachings serve to wake us up from this trick we all play on ourselves and to offer us a far brighter reality: the true and joyous liberation that inevitably involves letting go of the self rather than working to improve it. It is a message that has resonated with students for nearly thirty years and remains fresh as ever today. This new edition includes a foreword by Chögyam Trungpa's son and lineage holder, Sakyong Mipham.

©1973 Chögyam Trungpa (P)2015 Audible, Inc.

Hörerrezensionen

Bewertung

Gesamt

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Sterne
    9
  • 4 Sterne
    0
  • 3 Sterne
    1
  • 2 Sterne
    0
  • 1 Stern
    0

Sprecher

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Sterne
    7
  • 4 Sterne
    1
  • 3 Sterne
    0
  • 2 Sterne
    0
  • 1 Stern
    0

Geschichte

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Sterne
    7
  • 4 Sterne
    0
  • 3 Sterne
    1
  • 2 Sterne
    0
  • 1 Stern
    0
Sortieren nach:
  • Gesamt
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Sprecher
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Geschichte
    5 out of 5 stars

The ego is the obstacle on the path

The basic idea is, any way in which we’re pursuing truth, non-duality, oneness as an object that we are pursuing, that we imagine we’re going to have, is itself an obstacle to what it is to the attainment that we are seeking, because being in that relationship, “I’m seeking oneness” immediately separates you from oneness and creates two, right? It’s a simple idea, but Trungpa, in speaking about many of the ideas of the Tibetan tradition, really goes into fine detail as to what exactly that means and how exactly we can avoid it. Now, there’s one beautiful, very short sentence—I just find it very powerful and I wanted to quote it. It kind of exemplifies what I just said. It encapsulates a huge part of the idea of spiritual materialism in just a few words, and it says, “Ego is always trying to achieve spirituality. It is rather like wanting to witness your own funeral.” So the reason why I find that so profound is that it’s pointing to the fact that when we are seeking non-dual awakening, non-dual unity, oneness, what we’re seeking is the end of the separate sense of self, of the sense that “I am Daniela Pieper from Germany, separate from the world, separate from other people.” That’s what the ego is.