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    Inhaltsangabe

    From best-selling writer David Graeber, a powerful argument against the rise of meaningless, unfulfilling jobs and their consequences.

    Does your job make a meaningful contribution to the world? In the spring of 2013, David Graeber asked this question in a playful, provocative essay titled “On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs”. It went viral. After a million online views in 17 different languages, people all over the world are still debating the answer. 

    There are millions of people - HR consultants, communication coordinators, telemarketing researchers, corporate lawyers - whose jobs are useless, and, tragically, they know it. These people are caught in bullshit jobs. Graeber explores one of society’s most vexing and deeply felt concerns, indicting among other villains a particular strain of finance capitalism that betrays ideals shared by thinkers ranging from Keynes to Lincoln. 

    Bullshit Jobs gives individuals, corporations, and societies permission to undergo a shift in values, placing creative and caring work at the center of our culture. This book is for everyone who wants to turn their vocation back into an avocation.

    ©2018 David Graeber (P)2018 Simon & Schuster Audio

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    Das sagen andere Hörer zu Bullshit Jobs

    Bewertung
    Gesamt
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 Sterne
      101
    • 4 Sterne
      38
    • 3 Sterne
      22
    • 2 Sterne
      5
    • 1 Stern
      6
    Sprecher
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 Sterne
      106
    • 4 Sterne
      26
    • 3 Sterne
      13
    • 2 Sterne
      2
    • 1 Stern
      2
    Geschichte
    • 4 out of 5 stars
    • 5 Sterne
      88
    • 4 Sterne
      29
    • 3 Sterne
      18
    • 2 Sterne
      9
    • 1 Stern
      5

    Rezensionen - mit Klick auf einen der beiden Reiter können Sie die Quelle der Rezensionen bestimmen.

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    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      5 out of 5 stars

    IT Made me think....

    C. Ragland was good as always. What was best about the Book ? It was not the collection of BS Jobs (which was faszinating) , but the end of the book. Imagine a world without all these useless bullshit jobs. the book made me think about it, rather than giving a complete Picture. thanks for the impuls. (please excuse the grammer of my writing, I am not a native) Danke für den Denkanstoß.

    3 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      4 out of 5 stars
    • UM
    • 08.06.2018

    A refreshing study of why we even bother to work

    Every bit of the facts rundown in this book is, unfortunately, true. The book is a great read. What I'm not sure about is the idea that the universal basic income would make the world a substantially better place. If we didn’t have to work at all, the 80% of idiots would make the 20% of progress-loving people unbearable. It is to be feared that, once the Basic Universal Income sets in, the percentage of idiocy would surge to 99%, and I only say 99% instead of 100% because I am a notorious optimist. Nonetheless, I recommend everyone to read it and to have a hopefully meaningful discussion.

    4 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      3 out of 5 stars

    Gute Ideen, bezweifle konkrete Zahlen

    Das Buch enthält einige gute Ansätze und wenn es Bullshit Jobs gibt dann sollte man sie streichen. Die insinuierte Anzahl und die Größe des Problems kann ich nicht nachvollziehen.

    1 Person fand das hilfreich

    • Gesamt
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      3 out of 5 stars

    Nice ideas but questionable author

    I actually enjoyed reading the book. It gave me a great new way of looking at jobs. But I think one has to be cautious with the author. Between the lines one can distinguish the author being in love with victim-culture and man-hating feminist ideas which one may or may not agree.
    Obviously the author seems to live in a fairy tale world in which milk and honey flow and he genuinely wonders why any one person living in such a world would ever let themselves down to do anything they do not enjoy. My guess is that this is due to the typical ivory tower thinking of university where people are paid high salaries working their hobbies and entertaining the next generation with their fanciful ideas under the pretence of educating them. It might be fun to study and teach anthropology but I would argue that one greatly increases their risk of finding themselves in a bullshit job after graduation if they have not spend their time in university actually learning something which they can use to provide value to the world (and this won't be anthropology).

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      5 out of 5 stars

    Absolutely worth listening to. Twice.

    Insight on things I always suspected. Offers a perspective on one‘s own suffering in the world of business and capitalism. Particularly scary was the quoting of the social value produced vs earnings of different jobs.
    Very happy to have listened to this.
    Before, I was on the sceptical pro side of universal income. The book delivers strong arguments why it is a good idea!
    Heartfelt thanks to the author.

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      5 out of 5 stars

    Loved it

    Would have preferred if the narrator didn’t try to emulate feeble voices for quotes by female contributors to surveys.

    • Gesamt
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      2 out of 5 stars

    Pseudo science

    The sample the author uses is not a fit for the calculations the proposes. 50 percent of BS jobs is exaggerated.
    While i like some thoughts the author has (archetype of the bs jobs) I feel like he is not informing me but trying to sell me his opinions and political beliefs as scientific truths. That attitude gets him 1 star. In retrospect I should not have hoped for more from a Marxist and anarchist.

    The reader did a nice job. I liked his voice.

    • Gesamt
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Gus
    • 18.08.2021

    great book

    my new favorite book. a must read for anyone experiencing "bullshitization" of their important job, or anyone struggling with a bullshit job.

    • Gesamt
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      1 out of 5 stars

    Bullshitbook

    the author clearly does give a flying feather about how or why moredn capitalist society is structured and is simply facinated with his own bullshit. Funny, that he frames this bullshit as a gamechanger insight.

    • Gesamt
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Sprecher
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Geschichte
      5 out of 5 stars

    Addictive

    After a while, I couldn't stop listening, being under the impression that this book would change my perception of people and things around me entirely. After happily finishing the book, I guess Graeber is a master of suggestive rhetoric ("a case could be made that..." seems to be his favorite phrase), but that his argument doesn't entirely hold up to reality. OK, the subtitle says "A Theory", anyway. So listen for yourself.

    Speaking of listening, I liked how Ragland performs the overall persuasive gesture of the text. Plus he reads the footnotes (and I haven't even noticed this prior to checking the written text). But he also does something downright outrageous for an audiobook produced in the year 2018: He genders voices of interviewees! This results in two types of voices, one testosterone-laden for men and a tender timbre for women (which doesn't apply to quotations of female authors). Hard to imagine how anyone interested in the phenomenon of bullshit jobs would approve of that. But maybe I am misjudging the target audience.