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Blueprint

How DNA Makes Us Who We Are
Autor: Robert Plomin
Sprecher: Robert Plomin
Spieldauer: 8 Std. und 22 Min.
5 out of 5 stars (5 Bewertungen)
Regulärer Preis: 22,95 €
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Inhaltsangabe

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of Blueprint, written and read by Robert Plomin. 

The blueprint for our individuality lies in the 1 percent of DNA that differs between people. Our intellectual capacity, our introversion or extraversion, our vulnerability to mental illness, even whether we are a morning person - all of these aspects of our personality are profoundly shaped by our inherited DNA differences. 

In Blueprint, Robert Plomin, a pioneer in the field of behavioural genetics, draws on a lifetime's worth of research to make the case that DNA is the most important factor shaping who we are. Our families, schools and the environment around us are important, but they are not as influential as our genes. This is why, he argues, teachers and parents should accept children for who they are, rather than trying to mould them in certain directions. Even the environments we choose and the signal events that impact our lives, from divorce to addiction, are influenced by our genetic predispositions. Now, thanks to the DNA revolution, it is becoming possible to predict who we will become, at birth, from our DNA alone. As Plomin shows us, these developments have sweeping implications for how we think about parenting, education, and social mobility. 

A game-changing book by a leader in the field, Blueprint shows how the DNA present in the single cell with which we all begin our lives can impact our behaviour as adults. 

©2018 Robert Plomin (P)2018 Penguin Books Ltd

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"A clear and engaging explanation of one of the hottest fields in science." (Steven Pinker)

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I wonder what impact this book might have

This was really a great read.
Having finished Blueprint, I wonder if the book could have an impact parallel to, say, the Selfish Gene by Dawkins. In that book he launched terms like immortal/selfish gene, replicators, organisms as survival machines for the genes, memes, and made a clear exposé of the neodarwinian logic of natural selection through variation as it had been developed in the decades before the publication.
This book also draws on research from the last 40 years or so from twin- and adoptions studies and behavioral genetics.
It makes a very clear exposé of the results and findings from twin- and adoption studies, and their importance for the future of psychology, our understanding of heritability and environment.
Family matters, but they don't make a difference.
School matters, but it doesn't make a difference.
A lot of things matter, but differences in all known human traits - the heritability - are, as a rule of thumb, about 50 % due to genes, and the other 50 % is something in the nonshared environment - meaning it's not your parents, but also that no research has been able to point to anything in the environment that has any big effect. It might just be randomness, chance

Some of the new concepts/ideas that I'm curious about if they will take hold as stable concepts or commonly shared knowledge through which we understand ourselves, mental illnesses, education, health, psychology, parenting and more are the following:

1. There are no qualitative disorders, only quantitative dimensions
2. The abnormal is the normal.
3. Polygenic scores.
4. SNIPS
5. The nature of nurture
6. High heritability scores as an indication of a meritocratic society

Had I been a young man, I think, this field of research is what I would have wanted to get caught up in.
I will be interesting to see if it will be part of a DNA-Revolution. Plomin has written the most accessible book that I have 'read' about this subject until today, and he also brings new ideas to the market, that I think will be with us for a long time to come.
Now, I've listened to it once, the paperback is in the mail, and when it arrives, I'll read it once more. This is a book that's worth knowing, truly understanding and thinking about.