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Johanna

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One Grave at a Time Titelbild

Cat and Bones as ghost hunters

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
5 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
3 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 11.12.2013

Cat still has to live with the "little gift" that the New Orleans' vodoo queen left her. But her interaction with ghosts reaches a whole new level when she meets one that can truly appear in flesh. And Elizabeth, said ghost, isn't the only one able to do that. She tells Cat and Bones of an evil ghost who tortures poor women and haunts countless others: Heinrich Kramer, former medieval inquisitor and author of The Hammer of Witches. A ruthless battle starts that only one side can win.

(Alright, where do I take those cheesy lines from? I don't know but sometimes I'm just lacking the cool and witty words to express things...)

One of my main points of criticism for the last book was the overdone sexuality between Cat and Bones and I was relieved that this book didn't focus on numerous vampire love plays, even though it's repeated about a hundred times how Bones is sexy as hell. But I can live with that. Now, unfortunately, there was another point that lessened my love for this book: the plot. Yes, you read that right. I never thought I would say something like that about one of Frost's books, but it wasn't as exciting as her others. There were even parts in it that were a little bit boring, probably because it focuses only on this battle against an evil ghost. In the last books, there were more issues to tackle, be it between Cat and Bones as a couple who've now grown into their relationship, or between the supernatural races on a larger scale. Kramer is indeed a malevolent creature, but fighting him wasn't enough for me to fill a whole book.

Still, I'm in love with Tavia Gilbert's reading. She is so incredibly gifted (even her German accent was alright). Gilbert knows how to differentiate dozens of characters with her voice and I've hardly ever listened to a speaker who could create that much tension which is, of course, also due to the author's great writing.

A particularly funny addition to the Night Huntress world's pool of characters was Tyler, the gay medium. He had the hots for Ian (and Bones... and Spades... he didn't meet any more male vampires but he would have tried to jump their bones too, probably) and I loved his inner comments that Cat had the unfortunate ability to listen to.

I was glad to meet many old friends again, like Spade and Denise. I'm not telling too much when I say that there is one especially heart-wrenching scene in this book involving those two.

The seventh book, Up From The Grave, will be out in January already, I hope they hurry with the audio production too. And I also hope that Ian will get his own book soon. He's so wonderfully sarcastic, I love him!

Lethal Circuit Titelbild

Great story with some recording issues

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
3 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
3 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 11.11.2013

Michael Chase is on a mission: he wants to find out why and how his father disappeared because he can't believe him to be dead. But having arrived at his destination China, he quickly finds out that nothing in his past and about his father has been like it seemed. His dad was a CIA agent and very quickly, Michael is involved in a chase after the Horton 21, an airplane that is powered by cold fusion. Finding this mythical technology is now the only way to stop the out-of-control satellite spiralling towards California.

Naturally, he isn't the only one looking for this device. Michael becomes engaged in a fight with international secret agiencies, Chinese businessmen and criminials, all following their own goals. He realizes that he cannot trust a single person other than himself. And he has to rely on the skills and lessons his father has provided him with throughout his childhood.

Lethal Circuit is a decent spy thriller which contains all typical elements of this genre. You can never be too sure who's on whose side, constantly looking for the mole or the character who will inevitably betray the hero. The plot is extremely fast with hardly a chance to catch a breath. A few times, I wondered how a complete amateur like Michael would keep up in this game of professionals. He seemed very calm, even in high-adrenaline situations, experienced with martial arts and weapons, has quick wits, and doesn't hesitate to do what is necessary, even the most gruesome things. So, he's definitely not your run-of-the-mill backpacker.

I really liked the flashbacks picturing Michael's childhood and his father's lessons for him. They provided more depth for character development and also for the plot. The author clearly tried to flesh out his characters other than just letting agents move across the chess board like puppets.

Now let's talk about what makes an audiobook so special: the narrator and the reading. The narrator has a great voice and he manages to keep up tension while reading which was great. But, the recording was the most unprofessional that I've ever listened to. Every single line that was cut into the reading was bluntly evident because it sounded like a child cutting and glueing together two different tapes. Even within a single paragraph it sounded like the speaker changed his distance to the microphone, his intonation, sometimes I even wondered whether it was the same speaker at all. At the beginning, I couldn't believe it was only one speaker.

Especially the narrator of the childhood flashbacks sounded off (in addition to him reading like he was speaking to an audience of 10-year-olds). All these changes soundwise made it hard to differentiate between the characters. Usually, the speaker tries to give each MC a unique voice. But the speaker's sound even changes within reading one paragraph, thus the reading loses a lot of its atmosphere. This was very annoying and affected my overall impression of the audiobook.

The book could have been amazing with a better recording. But still it was a great audiobook and I enjoyed the plot and the characters a lot!

This Side of the Grave Titelbild

Worthy sequel!

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
4 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
5 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 26.09.2013

In their fifth novel, Cat and Bones are finally facing Apollyon. Plus Cat still has to deal with some new abilities and her life as a full-blooded vampire now. I liked the role Marie played in this book, she's so scary and Gilbert really gives her an edge with this raspy voice. What I loved most was that Frost has found her humor again. Cat really knows how to say the most embarrassing things which made me laugh out loud a few times. Bones is is usual charming self, I was sort of missing Ian though. Maybe there will be more of him in the next novel. And I also think he deserves his own spin-off.

In order to keep things interesting between our married couple, Frost seems to feel some pressure to come up with new and original ideas in each subsequent novel. I wonder what they will "try out" next and hope they'll still be the characters I came to love so much.

I know I can usually just rant on about how amazing and wonderful Tavia Gilbert reads the Night Huntress books. And she does, really. But I don't know which fool told her to take it up one notch because that was so not necessary. Now, when she read a love scene, all this panting and moaning... well, I don't know, some things should be better left for imagination. Otherwise, I feel like I'm listening to porn, like an intruder in Cat's and Bones' sex life, which I definitely don't want to be. And when there was some intense fighting going on, her panting reminded me of .... *argh*! Way over the top! You know how it goes: doing more with less. That applies here too.

This Side of the Grave gives us fans all that we need and are used of from a Night Huntress novel: heart-stopping action, laughing-out-loud humor, tear-wrenching heartache and lots of new developments in the paranormal world the author created. I loved it and can't wait to get on to the next book!

Manche Mädchen müssen sterben Titelbild

Oberflächliche Teenie-Mystery

Gesamt
2 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 08.07.2013

Liz Valchar ist ein Geist, wie sie zu ihrem eigenen Entsetzen feststellen muss. Nicht nur, dass sie in dieser Welt mit einem fremden Jungen gefangen zu sein scheint. Sie hat auch keinerlei Ahnung, warum sie gestorben ist. Und ist Alex Berg am Ende doch gar nicht so fremd?

Die Buchbeschreibung klang durchaus interessant und ich bin seit Jahren fleißiger Hörbuchkonsument, also entschied ich mich, dieses Buch zu kaufen. Allerdings ist dies selbst im Abo fast herausgeschmissenes Geld gewesen. Judith Hoersch ist mit Abstand die schlechteste Leserin, die ich je ein Hörbuch habe vorlesen hören. Ihre abgehackte Intonation, die stetig monoton gleichförmige Sprechmelodie und die langweilige Darstellung der Charaktere haben das Zuhören fast zur Qual gemacht.

Die Story war anfangs auch noch recht interessant wurde aber schnell sehr durchschaubar. Wie jemand behaupten kann, dass sie tiefgründig war, ist mir jedoch ein Rätsel. Es geht einfach nur um eine zickige Highschool Diva, die selbst nicht in das Auto ihrer besten Freunde steigt, bevor die nicht ein paar Krümel aus den Ledersitzen gesaugt haben. Nach ihrem Tod stellt sie plötzlich in zahlreichen Flashbacks und Erinnerungen fest, wie furchtbar gemein und oberflächlich sie und ihre Freunde sind. Dieser Wandel ist nicht nur extrem plötzlich und daher kaum nachvollziehbar, aber er macht auch ein Buch nicht gleich tiefgründig. Nur wenige Charaktere haben einen Hauch von Komplexität, obwohl nicht ein einziger wirklich sympathisch ist.

Positiv zu bemerken ist, dass sich die Autorin nicht auch noch um ein kitschiges, plakatives Ende bemüht. Wirkliche Spannung wird allerdings nie aufgebaut. Dafür passiert einfach zu wenig, nämlich eigentlich fast gar nichts.

Ich kann nicht wirklich zum Kauf dieses Buches raten, vielleicht es jedoch einfacher zu ertragen, wenn es nicht von Frau Hoersch vorgelesen wird.