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danijobi

Köln, Deutschland
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This is what DFW is all about

Gesamt
5 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 01.04.2011

Okay, forget his short stories, forget his almost unreadbale, if enjoyable monster novel, these essays are a perfect was into the mind of one of the most brillant journalistic writers of our time. Taking seemingly simple assignments like writing about a lobster festival for a food magazine or reviewing a sports memoir, David Foster Wallace, with massive amounts of research and really deep thoughts, turns them into philosophical, ethical or artistic questions that define us as a species.
Wallace's voice reading his own material seems shockingly flat and hollow at first, almost expressionless. But stay with him, he is in his own way a perfect fit for the dry wit, the scathing sarcasm or the sober thoughtfulness of his own material. And if you only read or listen to one DWF essay, then "Big Red Son", which is the longest essay included here, should definitely be your pick. Enjoy!

3 von 3 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

More of a scandal romp than a history, but still interesting

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 01.04.2011

First of all - don't buy this if you want to get a clear and simple overview into the film history of the New Hollywood cinema. That story is in here, too, but it's kind of convoluted and besides the point. Peter Biskind has written a book about sex, drugs and the people who use them while making some films at the same time. At times he seems to be interested only in the scandal of it all, while almost involutarily writing a really fascinating book about art. So if you already know names like Dennis Hopper, Warren Beatty and Hal Ashby, then this can really be a valuable multi-biography full of unbelievable anecdotes and brillant insights into the connection of art and power.
Reader Dick Hill stilll enjoys the naughty bits a little too much, but on the other hand he effortlessly carries the listener over some of the more boring parts of this massive volume, so bear with him. A fine audiobook, but not recommended for the uninitiated.

1 von 1 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

Ubik Titelbild

An essential Philip K. Dick

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 01.04.2011

It's all here: The paranoia, the paranormal, the weirdness, the techno-psycho-complexities. "Ubik", the twisted tale of group of telepaths, their failed mission and the strange phenomena they experience thereafter, is one of the eesential Philip K. Dick novels, instantly recognisable by the slow deterioration of reality into something really sinister.
Anthony Heald conveys this atmosphere tinged with paranoia and fantasy perfectly in one of the audiobooks that are instantly gripping and can be recommended both for accolytes as well as newcomers to the Philip K. Dick universe.

1 von 1 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

A sensational find

Gesamt
5 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 01.04.2011

When you hear the introduction about the editor finding this manuscript by a long since deceased nobody and quickly discovering it as one of the quintessential comedic book of the century, you might get your expectations up quite high.
And guess what: A Confederacy of Dunces clears every bar, no matter how high. The book was funny as hell, but when you approached it the wrong way, a lot of the deeply disturbing humour might still be lost on you.
In this audiobook though, Barrett Whitener is utterly brillant in conveying the sheer madness of this universe, the creative chaos this is New Orleans and of course the utter weirdness and likability of this massive, one-of-a-kind protagonist called Ignatius J. Reilly, which you will never ever forget.

2 von 2 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

Surprisingly entertaining as well as thought-provoking

Gesamt
5 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 01.04.2011

This perfect companion piece (or rather update) to Bob Woodward's The Brethren describes the last twenty years of the Supreme Court under Chief Justice Rehnquist.
Both author Jeffrey Toobin and reader Don Leslie enjoy the juicy absurdities and excentricites of the Justices while at the same time stressing the historic decisions they make. A surprisingly entertaining as well as thought-provoking audiobook that sheds light on one of the most important political institutions of the USA.

Sober and dry, but fascinating

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 01.04.2011

As usual, the former Watergate reporter and nowadays present-time historian Woodward has a very detailled style with lots of minutiae and protocols. That might feel a bit dry at first, but once you got to know the players and their agendas, this, like all the best of Woodward's books, plays like a mixture between Shakespeare drama and courtroom drama.
Boyd Gaines tries a litle bit too hard with his voice squeezing out tension where there really isn't any, but this still makes for riveting listening.