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Raiko

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Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents a Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo Titelbild

So cute!

Gesamt
5 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
5 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
5 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 19.03.2018

It’s perfect. It’s cute. Adults will get the little jabs at politics, but it’s written perfectly for children. Absolutely adorable. Can’t wait for the book to arrive.

1 von 1 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

A Discovery of Witches Titelbild

This is a vampire romance. And not a good one.

Gesamt
1 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
4 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
1 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 20.10.2015

This is Twilight re-enacted with 30+ year olds, a mega Mary Sue character and a feeble attempt at plot. After plot actually happens for a brief amount of time, the main character falls in love with a vampire of terrible character and loses all sense of self-worth in exchange for utter co-dependence on him. So do not be deceived by the summary you may read on various websites talking about mystery, history and ancient knowledge - THAT plot is nearly completely dropped in favor of corny sap and a glorification of a relationship of questionable (e)quality. In fact, the key plot item LITERALLY disappears (the library simply cannot find it anymore) and does not actually come back within this book. And searching for it does not become a major plot point, either, which is very irritating. Instead, the protagonist earns a whole stack of rare, unusual, special, unique, amazing powers, one of which ultimately concludes the book with a hippie-cry for the freedom of love.
I cannot stand the characters, I cannot stand the writing (which sometimes can't even decide on a perspective within a single paragraph) and I certainly cannot stand the contents. I like what I considered actual plot, but there is only half of a plot in there to begin with.

3 von 3 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

Delirium Titelbild

Plot vs. Romance

Gesamt
3 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
3 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
3 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 12.05.2015

While I really liked the idea and the way it love as a disease and it's cure are depicted within this dystopian society, I could not stand the main character's very flat love interest, the often extremely corny language and was very disappointed by the plot (and, upon consulting summaries, the plots of the other books in the trilogy).

There were a handful of inconsistencies and some really weird comparisons (he looks like he is trying to swallow a porcupine)... and the ending is not explained well enough to justify the characters' actions, but going further into that would be a major spoiler.
The speaker has some great acting moments in there. She is very good at depicting the main character's -often subconscious- emotions in her reading. However, overall I found her voice somewhat annoying (shrill, at times), even in non-emotional moments. And since I already could not stand the main character's love interest, the smug, slightly drunk-sounding acting she used for him made it only worse.

Sieben Jahre in Tibet Titelbild

Sehr gelungen!

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
4 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
4 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 11.12.2014

Obwohl es in dem Buch zur Hälfte nur um einen Fußmarsch durch Tibet geht, bleibt es durch die vielen Personen, den aufrichtigen Schreibstil von Heinrich Harrer, und sein tiefes Interesse an Land und Kultur immer interessant. Man wird in eine andere Welt entführt, in der man des Tibet der 40er Jahre unweigerlich lieb gewinnt. Heinrich Harrers und Peter Aufschnaiters gewiefter Charme, mit der sie es tatsächlich bis nach Lhasa schaffen, hat mir regelmäßig ein Schmunzeln entlockt - und am Ende erreicht er genau das, was er will: Er bringt Tibet und das Schicksal dieses Landes und seiner Menschen unseren Herzen ein Stück näher.

Eine Warnung hätte ich noch: Der Mensch Heinrich Harrer ist in diesem Buch ein sehr viel anderer als im Film - weniger egoistisch und sehr viel aufgeschlossener. Auch erscheint die Rolle des Dalai Lama sehr viel kleiner als im gleichnamigen Film, denn hier geht es in erster Linie um Tibet und die tibetische Kultur, nicht um Tendzin Gyatsho.

15 von 15 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

The Scorch Trials Titelbild

Quite boring with little structure

Gesamt
2 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
3 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
1 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 11.12.2014

Seems like a plathora of bad things thrown upon teenage boys... for no real reason. At least none that has a good explaination (and as I read in other reviews - will not be have much of one in the last book of the triology). The writing is flat, the main character becomes increasingly more unlikeable and is also kind of dense. The Maze Runner started so well - what a fantastic idea to wake up in a giant, dangerous maze without any idea or memories about it. But I guess that's how far the authors' fantasy reached. Sure, he invents more cruel things to happen to the boys, but there is no depth, no real point to the cruelty, and not much of a connection between the different plot parts. Side characters come and are used like meaningless props without much personality or history. The writing is simple and boring, the special vocab of the book kind of weird. Altogether, I found the book pretty bland. I have no desire to finish the triology.

The Name of the Wind Titelbild

Good, long-winded and well executed

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars
Sprecher
5 out of 5 stars
Geschichte
3 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 20.09.2013

The Name of the Wind is altogether a great story. Kvothe is a fantastically flawed hero with a good deal of additions that make him more special than the ordinary person (books are not written about ordinary people). Partrick Rothfuss' magic system is well thought through and absolutely great - I love the science and knowledge behind it and the smart and creative ways in which it can succeed and fail. Nick Podehl does a great job voicing the different characters and presenting the various dialects that appear in the book. He makes me laugh, even in places where reading the text normally wouldn't - which is great! Unlike other reviewers, I really appreciate the use of a young-sounding actor, as most of the story is spoken from the eyes of a 15-year old boy, though technically told by an adult man. I think Nick Podehl was an excellent choice for the audio version. As a non-native speaker of English, I tend to avoid the typical "old, low-pitch man" voice that is so frequently found in fantasy audiobooks because it is much harder to understand than that of a younger person.

In general, Patrick Rothfuss has many great and well thought-through ideas, BUT there a good handful of things I did not like about this book, first and foremost how long-winded the story is (How *did* Rothfuss get this thing published as a debut novel with 260,000 words and comparatively little forward-moving plot?!). Secondly, his ability to choose names and foreign words is not exactly captivating and sometimes downright unnecessary or confusing. Thirdly, there are a whole lot of things I just found way too predictable in the plot and many of them put Kvothe, despite his many flaws, on a pedestral that seemed a little too high for him. Many plot points were predictable because Kvothe is just an edge *too* amazing. At other times, I found him (who is supposed to be smart and very capable of getting through life) too dense for being an intelligent teenager (not about love - I get that point), and then again a bit too knowledgeable and precocious. I understand that he is supposed to be a very talented person with lots of personal flaws, but sometimes his actions are more likely to come accross as inconsistencies in his character than different aspects of his personality. The many moments where Kvothe shares his abundant knowledge with others were a bit too much of a lecture for my taste. His school master affectation gets especially frustrating when it is based on real things that a smart reader will know already and does not want to be lectured about. Maybe the intention is to make the book especially appealing because of the parallels to our world, but that did not work out for me. It also makes sympathizing with the surrounding cast harder because apparently many of them are pretty stupid. I also got annoyed by the repeated occurrence of the hint that "in a story, now this would happen, but this is not a story..." - it was witty the first time, but not past that - especially if something followed that actually was pretty story-like, just not exactly fairy-tale material.

Yet, let's end this review on a good note because the books deserves a good deal of praise. This is a debut novel and it is an amazing one! Partick Rothfuss has a vivid imagination, many, many great characters of all types and genders, and an absolutely wonderful writing style. His ability to use words and comparisons and the way in which he keeps reminding you that you are actually listening to someone telling a story in retrospect are very engaging. Getting caught up in his well-constructed world, its laws, possibilities and hierarchies is very easy, even though it differs quite a bit from ours. There are many wonderful details that give Kvothe's environment that false realistic edge and makes it so very appealing. The book has a very healthy pinch of humor and carries a sweet handful of questions and mysteries with itself that keep the reader interested. I do believe that in future we can expect more really great books from Patrick Rothfuss. If someone who starts off as talented as this keeps on writing, it can only become amazing.

2 von 2 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

48 Days to the Work You Love Titelbild

I should have paid better attention

Gesamt
1 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 23.07.2013

I could not listen to even ten minutes of this book. I should have taken that "godgiven" in the description more seriously, or googled the publisher - this book begun dripping out Christianity and religion so heavily right from the start, I just found it annoying and distracting. I hope I can exchange this - as far as I know, Audible has a good policy for that. I just never exchanged the other dissatisfying book I bought because I had actually listened to it and I believe in paying for what I use. This, however, will remain mostly unused. I wanted career-advice, not a sermon. As I said, this is partially my fault - there were clues, after all.

1 von 3 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich

How to Become a Published Writer Titelbild

Badly executed

Gesamt
1 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 23.07.2013

This book is a low-quality recording of a fictional conversation between a writer and her student about publishing. If you have read anything about writing before, it offers next to no helpful hints, except a couple of clichés I consider outdated. There is some information about the publishing business (mostly "know your market") in this, but you don't need to be boredly dragged through this badly edited piece and its redundant dioalogue-format to figure out that you should spend some time doing market research.

Fiction Writing Demystified Titelbild

He knows that he knows what he is doing.

Gesamt
3 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 30.05.2013

--Contents:---

This book has some really helpful pointers from someone who knows and obviously loves what he is doing. I would be lieing if I said this book didn't help me overcome some obstacles in my writing because it gave me tools and pointers that I had not truly been aware of before.

However, while Thomas B. Sawyer tries very hard not to be, he *is* a little arrogant and it shows, which costs him one star in the rating. Possibly, he has some reason to be - he is a successful writer and a published author, but it can be pretty annoying. A short while into the book, it becomes very apparent that Sawyer is mostly a suspense writer for TV series, who thinks in scenes, dialogues and crimes and is firmly rooted in the real world and in script writing. Writers of high fantasy novels, fiction for children, simple fantasy or historical novels will find themselves dissatisfied with what Thomas B. Sawyer has to offer or even disagree with him. He does claim relevance to all fields of fiction, and for parts of his book that is true, but he knows too little about some genres to consider the differences in writing required for them. This would be fine, if he didn't completely ignore his own shortcomings in that respect. For example, by Sawyer's standards, George R. R. Martin (Song of Ice and Fire/Game of Thrones) would have to be considered a mediocre writer at best.

For more real-world rooted stuff, suspense and crime, the author does indeed have a good recipe, and it will make you a good handiman for the job. Do take him seriously on characters, dialogues, scenes and conflict, but keep in mind that he merely offers a standard recipe with a nice set of variables and that - in the end - it is your willingness to ignore Mr. Sawyer occassionally and to go out there and explore that can turn your solid novel into something special. You need to have the confidence to know where you do and don't care for his guidelines, no matter how he presents them to you (mostly as a recipe that you can differ from, but mostly shouldn't because he knows how it's done).

However, I have yet to withdraw another star because I find the bashing of other people's work absolutely misplaced. Disguised as examples how *not* to do some things, Sawyer loses himself in his frustration with certain pieces of work, some inner workings of the movie industry and even entire forms of art that he just doesn't like or has no vein for. Something the author does not like is not, by definition, badly written or a bad idea. I found these rants needless and annoying.

((And for those who have listened to this already - I don't know about you, but I DO say "What the...?" in real life.))

---Audio version:---

Jeffrey Thibeault's reading suits the book very well. I liked his young-sounding voice, reading pace and intonations, though some of this pronounciations threw me off at times.

Inferno Titelbild

Hat mir sehr gut gefallen

Gesamt
4 out of 5 stars

Rezensiert am: 23.05.2013

Dan Brown ist der eindeutige Beweis, dass er es selbst nach vielen Büchern, die ja doch alle einem sehr ähnlichen Schema folgen, noch schafft, den Leser (oder Hörer) zu überraschen. Klar, an ein paar Stellen habe ich mir gedacht "Mensch, Brown, wir wissen alle, was jetzt kommt, zieh es nicht unnötig in die Länge, das macht es jetzt auch nicht spannend" oder vorraussehen können, dass etwas in typischer Brown-manier nicht so ist wie es scheint, aber einige Twists und Enthüllungen haben es dann doch geschafft, mich zu verwirren. Gut gemacht! Manche mögen es allerdings schade finden, dass der historische Bezug hier keine so große Rolle spielt - das gilt dann leider auch für die Symbolik und die Kunst, die ja das Fachgebiet des Protagonisten sind. Hier geht es zwar auch um Gemälde, Bauten und Skulpturen, aber hauptsächlich ist dann doch Langdons gutes Gedächtnis für Kunst mehr gefragt als sein Wissen oder seine Interpretationsgabe. Symbolik kommt da kaum zum Tragen. Das kann aber auch als willkommene Abwechslung interpretiert werden. Auch ethisch ist das Buch sehr interessant. Bisher eines meiner Favoriten des Autors, trotz der etwas holprigen Wissenschaft.

Über den Sprecher kann ich mich übrigens nicht beschweren. Ich finde die Stimme und die ruhige, nicht übertrieben geschauspielerte Vortragsweise sehr angenehm und auch sonst hat mich nichts gestört. Die Stimme passt zu Robert Langdon.

6 von 7 Hörern fanden diese Rezension hilfreich